Friday, January 31, 2014

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

"This is My Body" - The Eucharist


Photo: "The Eucharist is the sacrament of love:
it signifies love, it produces love." 
- St Thomas Aquinas
"The Eucharist is the sacrament of love:
it signifies love, it produces love."
- St Thomas Aquinas


"The Sacrament of the Body of the Lord puts the demons to flight, defends us against the incentives to vice and to concupiscence, cleanses the soul from sin, quiets the anger of God, enlightens the understanding to know God, inflames the will and the affections with the love of God, fills the memory with spiritual sweetness, confirms the entire man in good, frees us from eternal death, multiplies the merits of a good life, leads us to our everlasting home, and re-animates the body to eternal life."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas


"This is My Body."
 Photo: "This is My Body..."
Receive Christ with love, reverence and humility - He is truly GOD <3

Sunday, January 26, 2014

Hope in Christ





Hope For The Broken Hearted

Let this truth encourage you today...


In Christ we have a love that can never be fathomed,
A life that can never die,
A peace that can never be understood,
A rest that can never be disturbed,
A joy that can never be diminished,
A hope that can never be disappointed,
A glory that can never be clouded,
A light that can never be darkened and
A spiritual resource that can never be exhausted.


Author Unknown

Friday, January 24, 2014

"Gimme Shelter" Movie



Powerful Pro-Life movie in theaters nationwide today! 

'Sometimes you have to leave home to find your family.'

 
'Gimme Shelter' the Movie

Sunday, January 19, 2014

Choose Life




"America needs no words from me to see how your decision in Roe v. Wade has deformed a great nation. The so-called right to abortion has pitted mothers against their children and women against men. It has sown violence and discord at the heart of the most intimate human relationships. It has aggravated the derogation of the father's role in an increasingly fatherless society. It has portrayed the greatest of gifts -- a child -- as a competitor, an intrusion, and an inconvenience. It has nominally accorded mothers unfettered dominion over the independent lives of their physically dependent sons and daughters"
And, in granting this unconscionable power, it has exposed many women to unjust and selfish demands from their husbands or other sexual partners. Human rights are not a privilege conferred by government. They are every human being's entitlement by virtue of his humanity. The right to life does not depend, and must not be declared to be contingent, on the pleasure of anyone else, not even a parent or a sovereign."

 (Mother Theresa -- "Notable and Quotable," Wall Street Journal, 2/25/94, p. A14)

Grow in Silence



"We need to find God, and he cannot be found in noise and restlessness. God is the friend of silence. See how nature - trees, flowers, grass- grows in silence; see the stars, the moon and the sun, how they move in silence... We need silence to be able to touch souls."
Mother Teresa

Friday, January 17, 2014

March for Life - EWTN







"

January 22nd, 2014
41st Annual March for Life
Washington D.C.
Teresa Tomeo Reports Live for EWTN
For Information:www.ewtn.com


March for Life"

Reporting Live for EWTN from the March for Life in D.C. 

9amET 



Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Tune of the Heart



“Let us pine for the City where we are citizens… By pining, we are already there; we have already cast our hope, like an anchor, on that coast. I sing of somewhere else, not of here; for I sing with my heart, not my flesh. The citizens of Babylon hear the sound of the flesh, the Founder of Jerusalem hears the tune of the heart.”
- St. Augustine

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Whatever is True and Lovely

Photo


"Here am I Lord; I come to do your will."

"Lord of the World"


Robert Hugh Benson, author of Lord of the World
Robert Hugh Benson, author of  "Lord of the World"


Article by Fr. Robert Barron:

Pope Francis and "Lord of the World"


 Nice article about an important book, Robert Hugh Benson's "Lord of the World.":


Book that Highlights the Danger of Secular Ideology


Monday, January 13, 2014

Prayers of the Rosary in Latin



 Have you ever wanted to learn to pray in Latin?

Make your prayers even MORE powerful. This website gives you the audio to help you practice the proper pronunciation of all the rosary prayers.


The Prayers of the Rosary in Latin

Sunday, January 12, 2014

New Cardinals Announced



 New soon-to-be Cardinals were announced today. 

 None are from America.


full text of the Holy Father’s announcement:

"As was previously announced, on February 22, the Feast of the Chair of Peter, I will have the joy of holding a Consistory, during which I will name 16 new Cardinals, who, coming from 12 countries from every part of the world, represent the deep ecclesial relationship between the Church of Rome and the other Churches throughout the world. The following day [February 23] I will preside at a solemn concelebration with the new Cardinals, while on February 20 and 21 I will hold a Consistory with all the Cardinals to reflect on the theme of the family."


"Here are the names of the new Cardinals:

1. Pietro Parolin, Titular Archbishop of Acquapendente, Secretary of State

2. Lorenzo Baldisseri, Titular Archbishop of Diocleziana, Secretary General of the Synod of Bishops.

3. Gerhard Ludwig Műller, Archbishop-Bishop emeritus of Regensburg, Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.

4. Beniamino Stella, Titular Archbishop of Midila, Prefect of the Congregation for the Clergy.

5. Vincent Nichols, Archbishop of Westminster (Great Britain).

6. Leopoldo José Brenes Solórzano, Archbishop of Managua (Nicaragua).

7. Gérald Cyprien Lacroix, Archbishop of Québec (Canada).

8. Jean-Pierre Kutwa, Archbishop of Abidjan (Ivory Coast).

9. Orani João Tempesta, O.Cist., Archbishop of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil).

10. Gualtiero Bassetti, Archbishop of Perugia-Città della Pieve (Italy).

11. Mario Aurelio Poli, Archbishop of Buenos Aires (Argentina).

12. Andrew Yeom Soo jung, Archbishop of Seoul (Korea).

13. Ricardo Ezzati Andrello, S.D.B., Archbishop of Santiago del Cile (Chile).

14. Philippe Nakellentuba Ouédraogo, Archbishop of Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso).

15. Orlando B. Quevedo, O.M.I., Archbishop of Cotabato (Philippines).

16. Chibly Langlois, Bishop of Les Cayes (Haïti).

Together with them, I will join to the Members of the College of Cardinals three Archbishops emeriti distinguished for their service to the Holy See and to the Church.

They are:

1. Loris Francesco Capovilla, Titular Archbishop of Mesembria.

2. Fernando Sebastián Aguilar, C.M.F., Archbishop emeritus of Pamplona.

3. Kelvin Edward Felix, Archbishop emeritus of Castries."

Saturday, January 11, 2014

Newest Book by Michael O'Brien


After reading most of Catholic writer Michael D. O'Brien's novels, I've been anxiously waiting for  the next  one.

 His newest novel just came out in December.  It's quite a change for O'Brien, as he tells his story through the genre of science fiction.

On Amazon, there is a preview of the kindle edition, a generous free preview, about 20 pages or more.

Click here to read:

Voyage to Alpha Centauri



Michael O'Brien, iconographer, painter, and writer, is the popular author of many best-selling novels including Father Elijah, The Father's Tale, Eclipse of the Sun, Sophia House, .Theophilos, and Island of the World. His novels have been translated into twelve languages and widely reviewed in both secular and religious media in North America and Europe. He lives in Ontario with his wife, Sheila, and family.




Friday, January 10, 2014

What is the Goal and Purpose of Life

In the first week of Alpha 201, Fr John Riccardo, pastor of Our Lady of Good Counsel Catholic Church in Plymouth, Michigan, talks about the goal & purpose of life.

Follow Our Lady of Good Counsel Catholic Church on Facebook: www.Facebook.com/OLGCPlymouth

Thursday, January 9, 2014

Morality and the Belief in God





Latest article by Father Robert Barron, looks at the relationship between morality and the existence of God.

"One of the most common observations made by opponents of religion is that we don't need God in order to have a coherent and integral morality. Atheists and agnostics are extremely sensitive to the charge that the rejection of God will conduce automatically to moral chaos. Consequently, they argue that a robust sense of ethics can be grounded in the consensus of the human community over time or in the intuitions and sensibilities of decent people."

"​What I would like to do is lay out, in very brief compass, the Catholic understanding of the relationship between morality and the existence of God and to show, thereby, why it is indispensably important for a society that wishes to maintain its moral integrity to maintain, at the same time, a vibrant belief in God.".....

No Good Without God

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

A Church With Full Conviction


NO MORE COMPROMISING!!! If we need to get smaller in order to get holier, then SO BE IT!!!

I am so very tired of compromises being made with the “world” … compromising our Catholic faith and our Catholic identity in effort to “grow the Catholic Church.” To what end? So that our pews may be teeming (at least for a time) with those who stand for very little, if anything, as they show utter disdain for the venerable traditions of their ancestors?

From Pope Benedict XVI’s (then Cardinal Ratzinger) book, “Faith and the Future.”

“From the crisis of today the Church of tomorrow will emerge—a Church that has lost much. She will become small and will have to start afresh more or less from the beginning. She will no longer be able to inhabit many of the edifices she built in prosperity. As the number of her adherents diminishes, so will she lose many of her social privileges. In contrast to an earlier age, she will be seen much more as a voluntary society, entered only by free decision.

As a small society, she will make much bigger demands on the initiative of her individual members. Undoubtedly she will discover new forms of ministry and will ordain to the priesthood approved Christians who pursue some profession. In many smaller congregations or in self-contained social groups, pastoral care will normally be provided in this fashion. Alongside this, the full-time ministry of the priesthood will be indispensable as formerly. 

But in all of the changes at which one might guess, the Church will find her essence afresh and with full conviction in that which was always at her center: faith in the triune God, in Jesus Christ, the Son of God made man, in the presence of the Spirit until the end of the world. In faith and prayer she will again recognize her true center and experience the sacraments again as the worship of God and not as a subject for liturgical scholarship.

The Church will be a more spiritual Church, not presuming upon a political mandate, flirting as little with the Left as with the Right. It will be hard going for the Church, for the process of crystalization and clarification will cost her much valuable energy. It will make her poor and cause her to become the Church of the meek.

The process will be all the more arduous, for sectarian narrow-mindedness as well as pompous self-will will have to be shed. One may predict that all of this will take time. The process will be long and wearisome as was the road from the false progressivism of the eve of the French Revolution—when a bishop might be thought smart if he made fun of dogmas and even insinuated that the existence of God was by no means certain—to the renewal of the nineteenth century.

But when the trial of this sifting is past, a great power will flow from a more spiritualized and simplified Church.
Men in a totally planned world will find themselves unspeakably lonely. If they have completely lost sight of God, they will feel the whole horror of their poverty. Then they will discover the little flock of believers as something wholly new. They will discover it as a hope that is meant for them, an answer for which they have always been searching in secret.

And so it seems certain to me that the Church is facing very hard times. The real crisis has scarcely begun. We will have to count on terrific upheavals. But I am equally certain about what will remain at the end: not the Church of the political cult, which is dead already with Gobel, but the Church of faith. She may well no longer be the dominant social power to the extent that she was until recently; but she will enjoy a fresh blossoming and be seen as man’s home, where he will find life and hope beyond death.”

From Pope Benedict XVI’s (then Cardinal Ratzinger) book, “Faith and the Future.”

“From the crisis of today the Church of tomorrow will emerge—a Church that has lost much. She will become small and will have to start afresh more or less from the beginning. She will no longer be able to inhabit many of the edifices she built in prosperity. As the number of her adherents diminishes, so will she lose many of her social privileges. In contrast to an earlier age, she will be seen much more as a voluntary society, entered only by free decision.

As a small society, she will make much bigger demands on the initiative of her individual members. Undoubtedly she will discover new forms of ministry and will ordain to the priesthood approved Christians who pursue some profession. In many smaller congregations or in self-contained social groups, pastoral care will normally be provided in this fashion. Alongside this, the full-time ministry of the priesthood will be indispensable as formerly.

But in all of the changes at which one might guess, the Church will find her essence afresh and with full conviction in that which was always at her center: faith in the triune God, in Jesus Christ, the Son of God made man, in the presence of the Spirit until the end of the world. In faith and prayer she will again recognize her true center and experience the sacraments again as the worship of God and not as a subject for liturgical scholarship.

The Church will be a more spiritual Church, not presuming upon a political mandate, flirting as little with the Left as with the Right. It will be hard going for the Church, for the process of crystalization and clarification will cost her much valuable energy. It will make her poor and cause her to become the Church of the meek.

The process will be all the more arduous, for sectarian narrow-mindedness as well as pompous self-will will have to be shed. One may predict that all of this will take time. The process will be long and wearisome as was the road from the false progressivism of the eve of the French Revolution—when a bishop might be thought smart if he made fun of dogmas and even insinuated that the existence of God was by no means certain—to the renewal of the nineteenth century.

But when the trial of this sifting is past, a great power will flow from a more spiritualized and simplified Church.


Men in a totally planned world will find themselves unspeakably lonely. If they have completely lost sight of God, they will feel the whole horror of their poverty. Then they will discover the little flock of believers as something wholly new. They will discover it as a hope that is meant for them, an answer for which they have always been searching in secret.

And so it seems certain to me that the Church is facing very hard times. The real crisis has scarcely begun. We will have to count on terrific upheavals. But I am equally certain about what will remain at the end: not the Church of the political cult, which is dead already with Gobel, but the Church of faith. She may well no longer be the dominant social power to the extent that she was until recently; but she will enjoy a fresh blossoming and be seen as man’s home, where he will find life and hope beyond death.”

Monday, January 6, 2014

Liturgy Teaching of Vatican II



"Although in recent years much has been done to spread an accurate knowledge of the teaching of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council, we are still a long way from Pope Benedict XVI’s desire that the faithful everywhere, led by their pastors, would rediscover the riches of the sixteen conciliar documents. The Year of Faith became a year of disbelief, humanly speaking, as we witnessed the almost unprecedented abdication of the papal throne and the accession of a new pope whose words and actions have been interpreted and misinterpreted in a dizzying whirl of media attention that has certainly not been characterized by a patient reassessment of the doctrine of the last ecumenical council—much less the doctrine of the twenty ecumenical councils and the fullness of Tradition that preceded it.
Today is the fiftieth anniversary of the promulgated of the Second Vatican Council’s Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, Sacrosanctum Concilium (December 4, 1963). If I may borrow a rhetorical strategy from Fr. Fessio, here is what your local liturgical scene would look like if we were all following, to the letter, the teaching of Vatican II:".......


Is Your Liturgy Like What Vatican II Intended?

 

Saturday, January 4, 2014

Refined in the Fires of Mt. Carmel




From "Courageous Priest":

"This is an excerpt from my book on how I came to become a priest.  St. John of the Cross is a saint who I tell people “saved my life”, not because I was going to kill myself or anything like that, but because his teachings helped me move past a very dangerous spiritual mindset that afflicts most people today – the mindset that if God is working in my life, I ought to feel it, and it ought to feel good."

 How St. John of the Cross Saved My Life

By Father John Hollowell

Wednesday, January 1, 2014

Catholic New Year Resolutions


Fr. Richard Heilman's 
Good Catholic New Year Resolutions

1) Put God first in your personal life, your family and your work. Great people always know how to prioritize. We too need to be reminded every day to put God first. With God in the first place, the rest seems to fit together naturally.

2) Put prayer as the most important activity in your daily routine. Living a fast pace life, we try to keep up with everything that needs to be done. Prayer, then, gets put off because it takes discipline and does not come naturally. Don’t we know that a day that is not started with prayer does not go that well? Fight the temptation to put it off till later. Later usually never comes.

3) Practice humility as a child of God. Love God so much that you fear offending Him. This is what “fear of the Lord” really means. And, love what God loves. That means loving your neighbor. Humbly put your neighbor’s happiness and needs ahead of your own. That’s what “children of God” do.

4) Be around holy people who support us, challenge us, and council us on how to be holy. As we see in the Bible, Jesus gathered the apostles, disciples and friends around Him. We’re not meant to be lone rangers. Let’s be humbly open to other’s suggestions and constructive criticism, especially from holy priests and religious.

5) Read the Bible and other spiritual classics written by the saints. We have a great guide to help us on our way to heaven, called the Bible. All we have to do is sit down and open it and read it. We have thousands of older brothers and sisters (the saints) who have gone before us and cleared the path to heaven for us. How do we counter the indoctrination of a godless society unless we also hear “the other side of the story” – THE TRUTH – from the greatest book ever written, and from the greatest lives ever lived?

6) Be consumed by your dire need to “Be in a State of Grace.” Notice how close you feel to God when you are in a state of grace. Notice how happy you are when you are in a state of grace. Notice how open you are to the voice of God when you are in a state of grace. Notice how easily you love when you are in a state of grace. Notice how strong you are in facing the trials of life when you are in a state of grace. And, notice how empty and lost you feel when grace begins to leave you. Go to Confession at least once a month, and right away if you fall to serious sin. A “State of Grace is AWESOME!!”

7) Let Mary Mother You. Begin by praying the rosary everyday as your way of maintaining that maternal bond with Mary. She is the one who crushes the head of the serpent – who protects her dear children from harm. She is the one who dresses up and prepares all of your petitions and presents them to God on your behalf. Keep your mother close to you.